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  •                                 NETFUTURE
    
                Technology and Human Responsibility for the Future
    
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    Issue #14      Copyright 1996 O'Reilly & Associates          April 2, 1996
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                Editor:  Stephen L. Talbott (stevet@netfuture.org)
    
                         On the Web: http://netfuture.org
         You may redistribute this newsletter for noncommercial purposes.
    
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    ####  Don't forget the $5000 SPIDER OR FLY? deadline: April 30, 1996  ####
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    CONTENTS:
    *** Editor's note
    *** A hunger for the natural world
          An interesting report from Publisher's Weekly
    *** What Turkle misses (Sue Barnes)
          Virtual lives are not separate from real lives
    *** It's simple Kevin: don't upgrade (Siddhartha Mukherjee)
          Successful employee resistance has occurred
    *** Luddites and technicians keep society in balance (Don Davis)
          Both are necessary
    *** What separates a Postman from a Negroponte? (Claire Benedikt)
    *** Metaphysics underlies technology debates (Christopher Stahnke)
          Western culture has repressed certain aspects of the human being
    *** I, too, am starting to worry (Kirk McElhearn)
          A vision of neo-luddites in caves
    *** We relate to technology as to an archetype (Kevin Jones)
          A technological shaman within the male psyche?
    *** A further note about the stirrup (Dave Davis)
    *** About this newsletter
    

    *** Editor's note

    A number of notes in this issue respond to Kevin Jones' long complaint in NF-13. Kevin then adds his own postscript. First, however, comes a brief item about the "return to nature" literature, and further comment on Turkle and Postman by Sue Barnes. Sue is editor of the online journal, Interpersonal Computing and Technology. SLT

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    *** A hunger for the natural world

    A feature article on "Helping To Restore the Natural Order" in the March 25 issue of Publisher's Weekly discusses the flourishing market for natural history titles "with a spiritual bent." The article describes the literature this way:

    A common thread appears to be a numinous sense of the sacred in the natural world and of the healing power of reconnecting in a fundamental way with that world.
    An editor is quoted as seeing "a huge demand for this kind of book": "People are starved for connection with the natural world. They have lost their sense of intimacy with it and want `shamans' to guide them back."

    It's interesting to juxtapose this trend with the overall rush of society to go online. I'm wondering whether some among our readers have given serious thought to this juxtaposition and might be willing to share some of that thought.

    SLT

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    *** What Turkle misses
    Response to "Can